Baked My New Skates – Here’s How

Graf-Skates

As someone that likes to do things myself, yesterday I baked my skates to avoid some of the pain that breaking in new skates has historically caused me.  I completed the molding process at home before I had them sharpened.  By the way, I got them sharpened with a 1/2″ radius.  This is probably the most common radius, but also seems ideal for my weight.

Do not do this if your skate is not intended to be thermoformable (most higher-end hockey skates manufactured today are).  Its probably best to get this done by the shop you buy them from, so please note, I’m not responsible if this doesn’t work for you or voids your warranty.  I was driven to the internet after months of trying to buy this model from my local NYC shop (Graf G735 Overload fits the shape of my foot and has the best level of stiffness for my weight).

Anyway, here are the instructions for what I did (get the instructions for your brand):

  1. Cut your toenails and put on your favorite pair of skating socks.
  2. Loosen your laces so that your foot is able to very easily slip all the way in.  Make sure the insole is properly positioned.
  3. Make sure your oven has enough clearance to accept the skate on a baking sheet, and pre-heat the oven to 180°.  Once heated, turn off the oven.
  4. Place one skate on baking sheet in the oven making sure the skate does not touch any heating element or the sides of the oven.  Do not leave the oven door open more than a few seconds so the heat is retained.
  5. Bake for 7 minutes and remove skate.
  6. Sit down in your favorite chair, make sure you feet can be placed on junky carpet, a piece of thick cardboard, or rubber floor.
  7. Put on the skate and make sure your heel is forced back comfortably (you can kick your heel down a little if needed).  Lace from the bottom, and do it a little less violently than you normally do it so that you don’t harm the eyelets.
  8. Do not stand up.  Just sit there for 15 minutes.  If you feel too much tightness in the width, you can widen the skate slightly by standing up for a minute.  But do not walk around.
  9. After 15 minutes, loosen the laces a lot so that your foot can easily be removed without any struggle. Lace up the skate and set it upright against a wall and leave it for at least 7 hours to cool down and harden.  Best not to skate on it for 24 hours.
  10. Repeat the process for the second skate.

Hope this helps you.  Have fun out there on the ice!

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Baked My New Skates – Here’s How

Graf-Skates

As someone that likes to do things myself, yesterday I baked my skates to avoid some of the pain that breaking in new skates has historically caused me.  I completed the molding process at home before I had them sharpened.  By the way, I got them sharpened with a 1/2″ radius.  This is probably the most common radius, but also seems ideal for my weight.

Do not do this if your skate is not intended to be thermoformable (most higher-end hockey skates manufactured today are).  Its probably best to get this done by the shop you buy them from, so please note, I’m not responsible if this doesn’t work for you or voids your warranty.  I was driven to the internet after months of trying to buy this model from my local NYC shop (Graf G735 Overload fits the shape of my foot and has the best level of stiffness for my weight).

Anyway, here are the instructions for what I did (get the instructions for your brand): Details »

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